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First Liberty Briefing

First Liberty Briefing is an exclusive podcast hosted by First Liberty Institute’s Deputy General Counsel Jeremy Dys. In about 90-seconds, once a week, Jeremy recalls the stories that have shaped America’s religious liberty, from the founding era to current legal battles and more. It’s an insider’s look at the stories, cases, people, and laws that have made America the world’s leader in protecting religious liberty.
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Jul 27, 2018

In 1956, when Elihu Schimmel wanted to celebrate the Jewish High Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah aboard his station of a U.S. Naval Vessel, the United States Army and Navy honored his religious liberty and helped make the Jewish service possible. Learn more at FirstLiberty.org/Briefing.


It was September 1956 and Elihu Schimmel was cold and lonely.  He was stationed aboard a U.S. Naval vessel above the arctic circle.  His location would account for his being cold, but he didn’t think there was much to be done about his loneliness.

Rosh Hashanah was set to begin and, aside from another Jewish sailor, Schimmel was several friends short of a minyan, a quorum of 10 Jewish men necessary for services.  But, Schimmel knew there were others scattered about the fleet in the coldest theater of the Cold War.

He decided to ask the powers that be if they would help.  The Navy, and the Army hitching a ride, enthusiastically agreed.  The order went out that those wishing to join Schimmel aboard ship would be transported—by seaplane, launch, or helicopter—for the observance of the Jewish High Holy Days.

When the time came, 10 Jewish service men showed up—exactly enough.  The Navy went further, announcing at sunset that the services were about to begin and ordering all aboard to show reverence by putting out their cigarettes.

Schimmel served out his time as a naval medical officer, but he would never forget that celebration, high above the Arctic Circle, made possible courtesy of the United States military. 

And, we now won’t forget how the United States military honored the religious liberty of its servicemembers.

To learn how First Liberty is protecting religious liberty for all Americans, visit FirstLiberty.org.

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