Info

First Liberty Briefing

First Liberty Briefing is an exclusive podcast hosted by First Liberty Institute’s Deputy General Counsel Jeremy Dys. In about 90-seconds, once a week, Jeremy recalls the stories that have shaped America’s religious liberty, from the founding era to current legal battles and more. It’s an insider’s look at the stories, cases, people, and laws that have made America the world’s leader in protecting religious liberty.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
2019
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1
Aug 12, 2019

Supreme Court of the United States sends Aaron and Melissa Klein’s case back to Oregon Courts to ensure the Klein’s had a fair trial and address the $135,000 state sanction that was put on them for discrimination. Learn more at FirstLiberty.org/Briefing.


The Supreme Court of the United States recently sent our case involving Aaron and Melissa Klein back to Oregon.  You may be wondering: why didn’t the Justices just decide the issue once and for all? 

It’s a fair question, and only 9 Americans really know the answer, but perhaps part of the reason is that state-sanctioned hostility to religion keeps getting in the way.  By remanding the case for review in consideration of the Masterpiece Cakeshopdecision, it seems the Justices are asking the lower court to ensure, first, that the Kleins had a fair trial.

That could be difficult.  Oregon’s administrator evaluating the charges suggested that the Kleins needed to be “rehabilitated.”  But, only the guilty are in need of rehabilitation. Prejudging the case seems unfair.

But, the Justices seem even more concerned with ensuring state officials respect the religious beliefs of those accused of discrimination.  Issuing a $135,000 penalty for “emotional damages” and imposing a gag order barring any public speech discussing their beliefs on the situation, suggests that the State of Oregon was less than respectful toward Aaron and Melissa’s religious beliefs.

In other words, it seems that the Justices are trying to stop the bleeding, stemming from an unfair process and state-sanctioned contempt for religious beliefs in public.  Once that bleeding stops, perhaps the court can diagnose and treat the actual problem. 

To learn how First Liberty is protecting religious liberty for all Americans, visit FirstLiberty.org.

0 Comments
Adding comments is not available at this time.