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First Liberty Briefing

First Liberty Briefing is an exclusive podcast hosted by First Liberty Institute’s Deputy General Counsel Jeremy Dys. In about 90-seconds, once a week, Jeremy recalls the stories that have shaped America’s religious liberty, from the founding era to current legal battles and more. It’s an insider’s look at the stories, cases, people, and laws that have made America the world’s leader in protecting religious liberty.
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Mar 15, 2019

Seth Clark, a salutatorian from Akin, Illinois decided to quote the Bible in his graduation speech. A community member complained that religious content would be shared on school grounds. But there’s a neat and surprising story. Listen to how the situation turned out by listening to FirstLiberty.org/Briefing.


Akin, Illinois is a small town in the heartland of our country.  There you will find salt-of-the-earth folks growing the crops that feed the rest of us. Everyone knows everyone, so it was no surprise when the Clark’s boy, Seth, was announced the salutatorian of his graduating grade school class.

But, when word got around that Seth was going to quote from the Bible in his speech, someone complained.  That complaint reached the school board and, soon enough, Seth was told that the Constitution would not let his speech with religious content be delivered on school grounds, to a captive graduation ceremony audience.

Well, that was that…or so it seemed.

The story has a bit of a surprise ending.  A neighbor who lived across from the school offered up his front porch.  So, when it came time for Seth’s speech, the audience turned around.  There, on the front porch of this iconic Midwestern town was Seth Clark holding forth, giving the speech that he always wanted to give. 

Perhaps you live in one of those towns where folks still stop to chat on the front stoop on a cool summer’s evening.  If not, you need to know that the Constitution never requires a student’s private remarks be given on private property. 

“It was the proudest moment of my life,” said Seth’s Mom.  Well, I suppose it was.

To learn how First Liberty is protecting religious liberty for all Americans, visit FirstLiberty.org.

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