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First Liberty Briefing

First Liberty Briefing is an exclusive podcast hosted by First Liberty Institute’s Senior Counsel Jeremy Dys. In about 90-seconds, three times a week, Jeremy recalls the stories that have shaped America’s religious liberty, from the founding era to current legal battles and more. It’s an insider’s look at the stories, cases, people, and laws that have made America the world’s leader in protecting religious liberty.
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Apr 17, 2017

Even truck drivers deserve religious liberty—that may be the clear lesson from a case recently filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Learn about the case at FirstLiberty.org/Briefing.

 

Welcome to the First Liberty Briefing. I’m Jeremy Dys.

Even truck drivers deserve religious liberty—that may be the clear lesson from a case recently filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

J.C. Witherspoon, Jr., Inc. hired Leroy Lawson in 2012. His job was to drive truck from the company’s South Carolina facility. During his pre-hire interview, Lawson informed the truck supervisor that, as a Hebrew Pentecostal for 35 years, he observes a religious Sabbath from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. During that time, he explained, he is not permitted to engage in any labor.

Just weeks after his hire, the company mandated that all drivers work on Saturdays. Lawson complied, but at the end of his shift, he informed his supervisor that the day’s labor would be the last he worked on his Sabbath ever again.

Thankfully, his company accommodated his faith, until December of 2013 when they asked him to violate the observance of his Sabbath by working. Lawson refused and was promptly terminated. 

Lynette Barnes, the regional EEOC attorney handling the case, put it well in a press release: “Under federal law, employers have an obligation to endeavor to fairly balance an employee’s right to practice his or her religion and the operation of the company.” 

Much of life requires that we make compromises. Federal law—and the Constitution—suggests that an employee’s religion should never be one of them.

To learn how First Liberty is protecting religious liberty for all Americans, visit FirstLiberty.org.

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