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First Liberty Briefing

First Liberty Briefing is an exclusive podcast hosted by First Liberty Institute’s Deputy General Counsel Jeremy Dys. In about 90-seconds, once a week, Jeremy recalls the stories that have shaped America’s religious liberty, from the founding era to current legal battles and more. It’s an insider’s look at the stories, cases, people, and laws that have made America the world’s leader in protecting religious liberty.
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May 9, 2018

A Nevada school district has reversed a long-standing that allows students in Washoe County to decorate their graduation caps. Learn how this story helped facilitate religious liberty by visiting FirstLiberty.org/Briefing.


A Nevada school district has reversed a long-standing policy just in time for its high school graduates to stick a feather in their cap.

Students in the Washoe County School District have, in the past, been prevented from decorating their graduation caps.  The policy prevented what we might call graduation graffiti, the inappropriate decorating of caps and gowns with vulgar language and even gang symbols.  But, in its zeal to protect the solemnity of the day, the policy prevented Native American students from decorating their cap with an eagle feather.

Native Americans attach significant spiritual meaning to eagle feathers. The district’s policy prevented Quecholi Nordwall’s older sister from wearing a feather at graduation in 2014 and he was determined to make a difference this year. 

And it looks like that’s just what happened. With the change in policy, the school district has, in fact, opened the graduation cap to decoration once more.  The district could probably still prevent vulgar and lewd messages from appearing, but now, not only may Native American students adorn their caps with an eagle feather, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, and other religious students should be able to decorate their caps with reference to their faith. 

This is how religious liberty encourages liberty, tolerance, and diversity:  As one faith group’s religious expression is protected, it means that those of other faiths benefit as well. 

To learn how First Liberty is protecting religious liberty for all Americans, visit FirstLiberty.org.

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