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First Liberty Briefing

First Liberty Briefing is an exclusive podcast hosted by First Liberty Institute’s Senior Counsel Jeremy Dys. In about 90-seconds, three times a week, Jeremy recalls the stories that have shaped America’s religious liberty, from the founding era to current legal battles and more. It’s an insider’s look at the stories, cases, people, and laws that have made America the world’s leader in protecting religious liberty.
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Jun 2, 2017

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kansas City filed a lawsuit against the Mission Woods city council for denying the use of his own home for religious meetings on the basis of traffic and parking concerns. Learn more about this issue at FirstLiberty.org/Briefing.

The city of Mission Woods, Kansas covers just 64 acres outside of Kansas City. Its part-time government leadership is concerned that the expansion of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kansas City into their small town is going to cause problems.

The Archdiocese purchased a derelict home in Mission Woods. The roof had holes in it. Animals roamed the attic freely. But the Archdiocese favored the house for prayer groups, religious meetings and religious education throughout the week. Nonetheless, the Mission Woods city council has twice denied their application citing traffic and parking concerns. 

In the past, the city council has approved more expansive land-use in the same area for secular groups like athletic fields for the local high school and a significant parking lot for the University of Kansas health system. It appears that sports and parking are preferred by the city council, but parking for religious meetings is unwelcome. 

The Archdiocese has taken the appropriate step to file a lawsuit under the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act or RLUIPA. It may appear insignificant, but this case gives all the appearances of religious discrimination. Congress understood that city councils could easily hide religious discrimination within neutral rationales and zoning ordinances like traffic and parking. RLUIPA forces a closer look at those seemingly neutral defenses, requiring an agency to demonstrate their fairness.

To learn how First Liberty is protecting religious liberty for all Americans, visit FirstLiberty.org.

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